Web redirect

New work, news and Images from the shop. If you would like to know more about my art, please visit my full website @ www.chrisbathgate.com

6/24/14

DK 522244322

Machine Art, Machined Metal Sculpture, metal Art

It has been a little while since my last post, spring brought with it a few home projects, trips, and art obligations that all conspired to slow things down in the shop for a little while. But with the distractions now out of the way and production getting back to normal, I am happy to post pictures of my newest work.

Machine Art, Machined Metal Sculpture, metal Art

Dimensions on this piece are approximately 6.5"x6.5"x6.5"

Machine Art, Machined Metal Sculpture, metal Art



Machine Art, Machined Metal Sculpture, metal Art



Machine Art, Machined Metal Sculpture, metal Art



Machine Art, Machined Metal Sculpture, metal Art



Machine Art, Machined Metal Sculpture, metal Art



Technical Blueprint, art schematic


The blue print for this one measures 18" square.


Some quick build Notes. Although the Aluminum disks that make up the upper and lower sections of the piece were a lot of fun to make (image above), the stainless steel center disk on this work (below) was the biggest logistical challenge for this piece. It is made out of 304 Stainless steal alloy, which is really tough stuff. The machine work on this piece was very slow and tedious, but the result was this flawless disk that will more than likely, last centuries.


Below is a clip showing the agonizingly slow drilling process for this part. I went through a lot of bits, over many days, drilling all of the fifty four holes in this part. it took me at least ten times longer to make this out of stainless than it would have had I used Aluminum instead. But where is the fun in that.


Not the most exciting video I have ever posted, but it gives a good idea of the slow process of drilling this stuff. 

As always, questions, critiques, and other comments are welcome. 



3 comments:

  1. Why 304 Stainless and not 303? I avoid 304. Never figured out how to cut it without destroying tools.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I usually use 303, but unfortunately my metal supplier only had a piece of 304 in the size I wanted. Not wanting to wait for a special order, I decided to give it a try. I knew it was a little tougher, but I didn't realize what a huge difference in machinability there really was. Needless to say, I will probably never use 304 again, because as you say, it is very difficult to work with, I killed a ton of drill bits, reamers, and carbide inserts making that piece.

      Delete